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The death toll from the Camp fire in the Northern California town of Paradise jumped to 42 Monday, making the deadliest fire in state history, as President Donald Trump approved a major...
The Latest on wildfires in California (all times local):8:10 p.m.Authorities picking their way through burned-out neighborhoods say a Southern California wildfire has now destroyed at least...
Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow, right?
<p>To stand at the edge of an ocean is to face an eternity of waves and water, a shroud covering seven-tenths of the Earth.</p>
As firefighters made progress Monday battling the destructive Camp Fire that leveled the town of Paradise and killed at least 29 people, friends and family members of the more than 200 still missing have grown increasingly desperate with each passing day. Many residents who once lived in this quaint Sierra foothill town are retired seniors. Some have mobility issues that would complicate the hurried escape necessary to...
PULGA, Butte County — A woman who lives near the origin point of the disastrous Camp Fire in Butte County said Monday that Pacific Gas &amp; Electric Co. told her last week it planned to work on power equipment on or near her property, raising further questions about the utility’s role in what has become California’s most destructive wildfire. BetsyAnn Cowley, 31, who lives in the tiny mountain community of Pulga where the Camp Fire started, ...
At least seven people died in their cars as they tried to evacuate the flames that destroyed thousands of homes
<p>A lobster tattoo covers Drew Eaton's left forearm, its pincers snapping at dock lines connecting it to the American flag on his upper arm. The tattoo is about three-quarters done, but the 27-year-old is too busy with his new boat to finish it.</p>
The Camp Fire has burned around 113,000 acres, destroying more than 6,700 homes and businesses and claiming at least 29 lives.
A storm with snow, ice and rain will bring travel disruptions from the Midwest and southern United States to the Northeast spanning Wednesday night to Friday. Motorists and airline passengers in much of the eastern U.S. should be prepared for more delays as a second winterlike storm for this week runs its course. A weather pattern more typical of late December or early January will continue across much of the eastern U.S. this week. The pattern...
As if the gut-wrenching images weren't powerful enough, the staggering numbers behind the California wildfires show this recent rash of infernos is unlike any other:
Fire scientists say both nature and humans share blame for California's devastating wildfires, but forest management did not play a major role, despite President Donald Trump's claims.&nbsp;
The Woolsey Fire and nearby Hill Fire have forced the evacuations of nearly 250,000 residents from their homes near the Pacific Coast in California’s Los Angeles and Ventura counties.
Even modest temperature rises agreed under an international plan to limit climate disaster could see the ice caps melt enough this century for their loss to be "irreversible", experts warned Monday.The 2015 Paris Agreement limits nations to temperature rises "well below" two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels and to less than 1.5C if at all possible. That ballpark of getting 1.5-2C hotter by 2100 is scientists' best-case-scenario based on our consumption of natural resources and burning of fossil fuels, and will require radical, global lifestyle changes to achieve. For comparison, humans' business-as-usual approach -- if we continue to emit greenhouse gases at the current rate -- will see Earth heat by as much as 4C. Scientists have known for decades that the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica are shrinking, but it had been assumed that they would survive a 1.5-2C temperature rise relatively intact.However, according to a new analysis published in the journal Nature Climate Change, even modest global warming could cause irreversible damage to the polar ice, contributing to catastrophic sea level rises."We say that 1.5-2C is close to the limit for which more dramatic effects may be expected from the ice sheets," Frank Pattyn, head of the department of geosciences, Free University of Brussels and lead study author, told AFP.His team crunched data on annual temperature rises, ice sheet coverage and known melt levels and found that both Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets would reach a "tipping point" at around 2C."The existence of a tipping point implies that ice-sheet changes are potentially irreversible -— returning to a pre-industrial climate may not stabilise the ice sheet once the tipping point has been crossed," said Pattyn.- 'Tipping point this century' - The ice contained in Greenland and Antarctica contain enough frozen water to lift global sea levels several metres. The Greenland ice sheet alone has contributed 0.7 millimetres to global sea level rises every year since the mid-1990s.And the poles are warming faster than anywhere else on Earth, with Greenland alone 5C warmer in winter and 2C in summer since then. Although scientists predict it would take hundreds of years for them to melt even with huge global temperature increases, Monday's study provides further cause for concern with mankind's only realistic plan to avert runaway warming. Many models of the 1.5-2C scenario allow for the threshold to be breached in the short term, potentially heating the planet several degrees higher, before using carbon capture and other technologies to bring temperatures back into line by 2100. The study warned against this approach, however, saying that a feedback loop set off by higher temperatures would "lead to self-sustained melting of the entire ice sheet" even if those rises were later offset.For Greenland, the team said with 95 percent certainty that major ice sheet decline would occur at 1.8C worth of warming."For both Greenland and Antarctica, tipping points are known to exist for warming levels that could be reached before the end of this century," said Pattyn.
A brief but heavy burst of lake-effect snow will create dangerous travel conditions by midweek, including along the Interstate-90 corridor of New York and Pennsylvania.&nbsp;
Rising temperatures are creating new habitats for ticks. Lyme disease is transmitted to humans by black-legged ticks, pictured above. Rising temperatures are providing new habitats for these insects. German physician Alfred Buchwald had no clue that the chronic skin inflammation he described in 1883 was the first recorded case of a serious tick-carrying disease, one that would take hold in a small Connecticut town almost a century later and go on to afflict people across the United States. Today we know a lot more than Buchwald did about Lyme disease — that it is caused by a bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, and it is transmitted to humans by blacklegged ticks, and that it can cause untold misery for those infected. U.S. scientists first recognized the disease in the 1970s in Old Lyme, Connecticut — hence the name. The condition starts with fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic bullseye rash. Untreated, it can spread to the joints, the heart, and nervous system producing long-lasting, debilitating symptoms. Early use of antibiotics is crucial. About 300,000 Americans are diagnosed annually with Lyme, with cases concentrated in the Northeast and upper Midwest, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The incidence of the disease has doubled in the United States since 1991, according to the EPA. And it’s about to get much worse, thanks to climate change. “Warmer temperatures are making cold places suitable habitats for ticks, so new places are having Lyme disease cases, and endemic areas are having more cases than the average,” said Edson Severnini, assistant professor of economics and public policy at Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College, and co-author of a new study that predicts the incidence Lyme disease will rise around 21 percent by mid-century. Climate change already has amplified the range of invasive insects that devour crops, destroy homes, and spread disease. “Tick-borne diseases are an important public health concern and the incidence of these infections is increasing in the United States and worldwide,” said Igor Dumic, the study’s lead author and a researcher at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science who has treated numerous Lyme patients. “Lyme disease is a classic example of the link between environmental factors and the occurrence and spread of disease.” Ticks typically reside in wooded areas. Ticks spend most of their lives in environments where temperature and humidity directly affect their survival. For this reason, the EPA uses Lyme disease as an indicator of climate change. Higher temperatures spur ticks to venture farther in search of hosts, such as deer, which are more plentiful after warmer winters. “The Lyme disease vector tick needs deer to complete its life cycle, so this means that more ticks will be completing their life cycle, and consequently the tick population will increase,” Severnini said. “Also, as temperature rises, people may engage in more outdoor activities, increasing exposure to ticks.” The research, which appears in the Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology, examined the relationship between weather conditions and Lyme disease in 15 U.S. states. These states, located primarily in the Northeast and Upper Midwest, make up 95 percent of all U.S. reported cases. The scientists used epidemiological data from the CDC and at meteorological data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Warmer winters mean more deer, which host ticks. Assuming the temperature will increase by 2 degrees Celsius by mid-century — the forecast of the U.S. National Climate Assessment—the United States will see 8.6 more cases of Lyme disease per 100,000 people annually. That is bad news, but governments can take steps to keep the disease in check, Severnini said. “We need to educate people about how to look for ticks after going to wooded areas where ticks are abundant,” he said. “Secondly, people and clinicians should be aware that just because ticks are not present in certain areas it doesn’t mean that people aren’t traveling to areas where ticks are present. For example, a resident of Arizona, where Lyme disease is rare, can acquire it while camping in Wisconsin and get symptoms upon returning to [his or her] home state of Arizona.” It’s not just education, Severnini said. “We can also invest in the development of a Lyme vaccine, use insecticide and acaricidal to decrease the tick population,” he added. “Finally, we can prevent severe global warming.” Marlene Cimons writes for Nexus Media, a syndicated newswire covering climate, energy, policy, art, and culture.
Among the millions of veterans who serve in the U.S. armed forces are a group of specially trained meteorologists, aerographers and oceanographers who provide critical weather information for military operations.&nbsp;
Monster storm hit Florida’s Panhandle, causing damage — some of it catastrophic — along a 70-mile stretch of coastline.
Deadly wildfires such as those raging in northern and southern California have become more common across the state and elsewhere in the world in recent years.&nbsp;
The recent lull in tropical activity across the Atlantic Ocean may come to end at midweek. An area of disturbed weather, known as a tropical wave, is churning toward the Lesser Antilles and being monitored to potentially become the next organized system in the Atlantic Basin. The system is currently in an environment that does not support development, but that could change depending on the track it takes. "Should this system track far enough to...
"I'm about to hit the ground but the bottom of my shoes were melting. I ... prayed to God, 'Please, don’t let me die like this,'" said nurse Nichole Jolly.
It comes as quite a shock when the ground beneath your feet, your house or your field suddenly disappears leaving a hole. This hole may be tens of metres or more deep, and it will eventually lead into a cavity which may extend downwards for hundreds of metres below the ground. We call these sinkholes, and they are a global problem. Sometimes sinkholes are a purely natural phenomenon, but they may also be associated with previous industrial...
Traveling at about 20 feet a year, the muddy mystery has no obvious driver—and so far, it can't be stopped.
<p>Fires are raging across California, fueled by very dry conditions and strong Santa Ana winds.</p>
This foothill town on a wooded Sierra Nevada ridge has dodged devastation before. A decade ago, in the summer of 2008, two ferocious wildfires ran right up to its edges. More than 130 homes burned to the ground in the surrounding rural areas, but damage was relatively limited inside its borders, where mobile home parks and modest mountain houses fill up its warren of streets. Following those fires -- part of what Cal Fire still refers to as the "2008 siege"...
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